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    Staging Tips You Might Not Know About

    If you’re familiar with real estate trends over the last 10 years, you’ve likely heard the word “www.” There are professional stagers who can make a space look great for showings, and there are things you can do as a homeowner as well. We all think of staging in terms of removing personal effects, decluttering, and making your home look great in photos. 

    These tips from the experts cover a few things you might not consider when staging your home to sell. Now is a great time to sell your home and these tips will give you the added oomph to do it quickly and for top dollar!

    Unstuff Closets/Pantries/Cabinets- When most homeowners think of staging, they think of the rooms that will be shown in listing photos. Those are important to consider, but they aren’t where the work ends. Showings will display your entire home, even that junk closet that’s crammed with 25 puffer coats and old board games. It’s a good idea to envision a buyer opening up each closet in your home when you stage. What will your pantry or cabinet look like to them? If the answer is, “it will look too small and crowded,” then it’s a good idea to reduce stuff and stage that space!

    Think Like a Hotel- Ah, a comfortable stay in a hotel. Who doesn’t love to sleep in a beautiful space? Think about all the things that make a hotel stay comfortable. The room is uncluttered, the color schemes are calming, and the space is inviting. Think of your rooms like a hotel. Make buyers feel comfortable and drawn toward the rooms in your home in this way. 

    Add Light- We don’t always consider the light in our homes as a design feature, but it’s one of the top reasons buyers love or hate homes. Light affects the impression a buyer will have in either a positive or negative way. Consider buying brighter bulbs for your home, remove heavy window treatments, and rearrange furniture that blocks natural light from windows. 

    Don’t be Afraid of Blank Wall Space- If a space is full of distracting items, it’s difficult for a potential buyer to see past the distractions. While a well-decorated space could have wall-to-wall artwork, it’s best to reduce it when you get ready to sell. The experts agree that occasional (non-personal) artwork is a good idea. It’s important to strike a good balance. Blank space on walls gives buyers a place to rest their eyes and the illusion of larger rooms. 

    Consider Each Room’s True Use- Is your third bedroom used as a hybrid office/guest room/craft room? While that’s incredible and so helpful for your family’s lifestyle, it’s not great for the purpose of www. Do your best to showcase a room’s true use when selling. If a bedroom is used as an office, it may appear too small to be used for sleeping. If your room is cluttered with too many potential uses, it can also distract buyers from envisioning a room the way they’ll need to use it. 

    Add a Pop of Pretty- Clear countertops are one of the top things you’ll see on each staging guide. While removing excess items off your kitchen counters is so important, it’s not all about making a space completely bare! Add a beautiful vase of flowers or a pretty pitcher that coordinates with the color scheme of a room. Adding some life in this way will help to highlight the features further and will keep a space from feeling too sterile. 

    Show off Show Stopping Features- Each home has special features that make it special. If your home has a unique built-in bookshelf, consider adding a pop of color to draw the eye to that feature. If you have vaulted ceilings, add a large piece of artwork that draws the eye upwards. Staging isn’t all about making a room sterile, it’s also about bringing the correct attention to the spaces that make it extra special to buyers. 

    We hope these tips are helpful in staging your home to sell. Our top tip for staging is to ask an expert. Our agents are available to guide you through the process of preparing your home to look its best when you get ready to sell. Give us a call today! 

    Photo by Mark McCammon via Pexels.com. 

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